The big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy. The Big Flatline by Jeff Rubin · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries 2019-01-25

The big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy Rating: 4,9/10 1615 reviews

The big flatline : oil and the no

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

The end of growth is intolerable, inconceivable, and unacceptable. For example, the Canadian tar sands contain 1. In the second half, he makes a heroic effort to recommend strategies for responding to the mess. Rubin points out that there is no research to show that people living in countries with hard-charging economies are happier, and plenty of research to show that some of the most contented people on the planet live in places with no growth or slow growth. Both politicians and economists are missing the fact that the real engine of economic growth has always been cheap, abundant fuel and resources. Beginning in 2008, writes Rubin Why Your World Is About to Get a Whole Lot Smaller: Oil and the End of Globalization, 2009 , the high cost of oil consumption drove many nations on different continents into an economic tailspin. What it will be like to live in a world where growth is over? The mortgage crisis in the United States, so often blamed as the primary cause, was collateral damage rather than the trigger.

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The big flatline : oil and the no

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

But is this all bad? As we zoom toward a static no-growth economy, it would be intelligent to prepare for it, to make the transition less turbulent. The key issue is not absolute supply, but production costs—oil that nobody can afford to extract is useless. He spent 20 years flying around the world, hanging out with the rich and powerful, and this was a mind-altering experience. He was one of the first economists to accurately predict soaring oil prices back in 2000, and is now one of the world's most sought-after energy experts. Rubin enables us to achieve a more respectable balance with finite resources and to plan thoughtfully a more dignified future.

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What Is Sustainable: The Big Flatline

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

Transportation costs will also encourage the recovery of localized economies. The E-mail message field is required. Instead of moving us toward economic recovery, the measures being taken around the globe right now are digging us into a deeper hole. Instead of moving us toward economic recovery, the measures being taken are digging us into a deeper hole. The end of cheap oil, Rubin argues, signals the end of growth—and the end of easy answers to renewing prosperity.

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THE BIG FLATLINE by Jeff Rubin

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

Debt-crippled economies will be helpless sitting ducks when the next recession strikes. With consumerism growing precipitously in China and India as their already massive populations expand, those nations will find ways to grab more fossil fuels, and the U. The end of cheap oil, Rubin argues, signals the end of growth--and the end of easy answers to renewing prosperity. But that era is over. Contradicting conventional wisdom about the worldwide recession now in its fourth year, a Canadian economist predicts a gloomy future for consumers who worship growth. Jeff tells it like it needs to be told. Flooding the economy with new money will do nothing to encourage recovery, because it does not address the core problem, energy scarcity.

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The Big Flatline by Jeff Rubin · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

Rubin is not shy about trumpeting the correctness of his analysis; he states unequivocally that the reason economists and politicians have failed to reverse the current recession is that they are relying on outmoded world views. The Big Flatline In The Big Flatline, economist and resource analyst Jeff Rubin is certain that the world s governments are getting it wrong. Rubin points out that there is no research to show that people living in countries with hard-charging economies are happier, and plenty of research to show that some of the most contented people on the planet live in places with no growth or slow growth. Bailouts created enormous strains for many nations. In The Big Flatline Rubin points out that there is no research to show that people living in countries with hard-charging economies are happier, and plenty of research to show that some of the most contented people on the planet live in places with no growth or slow growth. For example, environmental opposition to the Keystone pipeline is likely to send the crude to China, raising the likelihood of another Exxon Valdez supertanker disaster.

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The Big Flatline: Oil and the No

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

Advances in technology will never be significant enough to allow continued economic growth, Rubin writes, and he characterizes green energy sources as worthy but inconsequential. His goal is a fairly smooth transition to a static economy, which he presents as a realistic possibility. There is only one path forward, by any means necessary — a beautiful recovery followed by an eternity of perpetual growth and heavenly prosperity. Economist and resource analyst Jeff Rubin is certain that the world's governments are getting it wrong. Instead of moving us toward economic recovery, the measures being taken are digging us into a deeper hole. Perpetual growth is never a free lunch. Rubin gives us a dope slap.

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The Big Flatline by Jeff Rubin · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

With China and India sucking up the lion's share of the world's ever more limited resources, the rest of us will have to make do with less. With compelling logic, he demonstrates that high oil prices have made endless growth unsustainable and that new strategies are needed for survival in a zero-sum world. Jeff tells it like it needs to be told. With China and India sucking up the lion's share of the world's ever more limited resources, the rest of us will have to make do with less. But that era is over.

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The Big Flatline

the big flatline oil and the nogrowth economy

But that era is over. Since grade C coal is so low in energy, it cannot be shipped long distances profitably. Rubin points out that there is no research to show that people living in countries with hard-charging economies are happier, and plenty of research to show that some of the most contented people on the planet live in places with no growth or slow growth. Jeff Rubin is the former chief economist at a major Canadian investment bank. His book, The Big Flatline , gives readers an opportunity to see Peak Cheap Energy through the eyes of someone from the executive suites.

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